Sunday, November 15, 2009

the winter can come now

Although this looks kind of sad it gives me a very good feeling. This monstrous piece of work is done. Hundreds of trees stored with the help of Lena, Melissa, Michael and Boris. It seems alomost impossible to believe that I used to do all this myself without help until a couple of years ago.
Now the winter can come. but probably we will keep saying 'they still could all be out' until Christmas. Well, sometimes we have 50 cm of snow at this time of the year. And we had temperatures down to minus 10 Celsius before Christmas. After Christmas we certainly will have snow up to 100 cm and temperatures down to minus 15 Celsius or even worse. So all this winter protection is very necessary. It could be even much better. Well, but where in the world do I put all these trees?
A normal person with a sensible number of trees should protect them as well as possible. But I simply cannot do this.



23 comments:

Pawel said...

Hi Walter, this greenhouse is heated or he cares only against dry cold winter?
Pawel

Walter Pall said...

Pawel,

when it gets below minus 5 Celsius I start the heater.

WP

Pawel said...

I see that most in greenhouse are hornbeams. What temperature is danger for them?

Walter Pall said...

A very small minority are hornbeams, only 5 %. Early frosts below minus 10 and late frosts are dangerous for hornbeams.

WP

houston said...

Thanks for the idea! Sometimes pictures tell us more than words would ever say.
We have a climate similar to yours (US - Chicago area). For 10 years my greenhouse made of PVC tubing with plastic covering has been sagging with the snow. I have to go out and shake the snow off to make sure it doesn't collapse. After seeing your photos, I realized that you install wooden 2x4s to reinforce your greenhouse roof for winter. I can do that too!

AJ said...

Walter ,

what is the last picture? ponderosa forrest?

Walter Pall said...

Last image is a cembra pine forest, also called Swiss stone pine.
Pinus cembra
WP

Philipp said...

Walter,
in june you wrote that some of your Rocky Mountain Juniper have lost some foliage last winter. Will you protct them special this winter or do just put them on the ground again?
greatings
Philipp

Walter Pall said...

Philipp,

I have placed them close to the house in the shade and there will be very little rain. The small ones I have placed in the greenhouse. We'll see.

WP

Daniel Dolan said...

Dear Mr. Pall:

I am a member of the Midwest Bonsai Society board in Chicago at the Botanic Gardens here. This year I plan to work hard to recommend that we invite you to be our Visiting Master to Judge the good sized annual show in August about 150 trees and over 12,000 visitors. We appreciate your valuable information and special artistry.

One short general question after seeing your recent winter garden photos....in general, do older more established trees endure the hardships of cold and wind a little better than younger trees, 5 years and younger?

Thank you.

Daniel Dolan
Chicago

Walter Pall said...

Daniel,

I would love to come Back to Chicago, where I was in 2005 already. I pencil in August 2010 :-)

Ye, I believe that young and especially small trees in small pots are not as hardy as old and big trees.
I am not so sure whether your climate is exactly comparable. You have more continental climate, which may well mean very cold winters. I am at the edge of continental climate and more Atlantic climate. So I have moderate temperatures in summer and in winter.

WP

johnson said...

ahh...call it population control. A good hard winter will make for stronger plants in the future...weed out the weak and feable. do you agree WP?

Walter Pall said...

Why would I agree with this?

WP

Don McCarthy said...

How large is the cembra forest?

Walter Pall said...

Larger than the hornbeam forest.

WP

Anonymous said...

Walter,
will you protect all Juniper or just the Rocky Mountain Juniper?
Thanks

Walter Pall said...

Well,

all trees are somehow protected. Just by placing them on the ground behind a post they are much better protected than on a stand. I do protect RMJ a bit better though. They now sit close to the house and get very little wind and sunshine all winter.

WP

Anonymous said...

Withh all due respect Walter, "sensible" people wouldn't have this many trees, that may be true. But the same sesible people wouldn't make the same "crazy" styling choices which give some of your winning trees their "flair" and charm. "Sensible" people wouldn't work so hard all day out in the field and then use the whole night to blog and share thier knowledge!
So thank goodness for the people, like you, who are not so "sensible" but are crazed with a passion for their art which is beautifull!

Anonymous said...

When it comes times to water the dormant trees in the greenhouse how do you manage this?

Walter Pall said...

I grew up in a family where 'normal' folks were considered very bad, boring, not worthwhile and to be avoided. Only when I was an adult I realized that it is not normal to absolutely hate to become normal and be crazy instead voluntarily.

WP

Walter Pall said...

I water the greenhouse with a big gardener can with water form the rainwater tub. If there is no water or if it is frozen stiff I carry several cans from the house. Sometimes I attach the garden hose and make everything dripping wet. This will suffice for another week normally.

WP

SKO said...

Awesome, absolutely awesome advice! This is my first wintering of my trees. I live in Utah with quite a cold climate. Do you recommend that I leave the trees outside on the ground under and overhang of the house or move them to my unheated, windowed garage? ALberta spruce, euonymus, boxwood, sequoia, and "nana" juniper - thanks!

Walter Pall said...

SKO,

Utah has continental climate unfortunately. This means that you have to protect your trees better than I have to. Leave the Alberta spruce outside and bring all the others into the garage.

WP