Friday, November 13, 2009

big hornbeam forest in winter

Lena and I plucked the foliage. Today I edited the forest for a couple of hours. Tomorrow hopefully better images. It will go into the greenhouse tomorrow. This is the only time I can get a good photograph. Otherwise it is just too much bother to carry


9 comments:

Anonymous said...

Dear Mr. Pall,

I had a question - I have collected a few hornbeams this year and now the leaves in fall colour, some fell down on their own, but others "stick" to branches. Is it ok/benefitial to remove them? I have read that for example on a beech the dry leaves should be left on over the winter to protect the new buds.

Thank you for sharing the information

Best regards,

Kestutis

Walter Pall said...

Kestutis,

you can remove them if you will protect the tree in a greenhouse, like I do. If the trees stay outside I would leave the trees where they are. European hornbeams are not very hardy in a pot. They need some protection; especially after collection.

WP

Nik Rozman said...

Hi,

Why will you put the forest in the greenhouse? The hornbem tree is a winter-hard tree.

Nik

vasile_laci said...

A splendid piece of nature ...

Vasile

Maros said...

Hi Walter,
what about hornbeams collected this spring, but rather big, 70-80 cm, complicated to move, in big heavy boxes? Any shelter needed?
Thanks
Maros

Walter Pall said...

Nik,

the European hornbeam in a pot is absolutely NOT a very hardy tree. It needs good protection. The most dangerous are late frosts. Yous seem to know a lot more than I do.

WP

Don McCarthy said...

Walter,

This creation reminds me of Epping Forest with its many hornbeams -- there though they are mostly coppiced and not as beautiful as these.

Maros said...

Hi Walter,
do you think also big hornbeam yamadori in rather big pots or boxes needs winter protection?
Thanks
Maros

Walter Pall said...

You bet I do. Look at what we do to protect it in winter!

WP