Sunday, September 6, 2009

mugo pine #16

Pinus mugo, mugo pine, 55 cm hihg, 75 cm long, way over 100 years old, collected by Horst Heinzlreiter in 1998, styled by WP from fall 2006, rock by Dietmar Popp.

First image 1999 in the garden of Horst Heinzlreiter
Second image September 2009, before
Then I played with the new rocks by Dietmar Popp. The good thing is that one can build a landscape with modules. If you don't like them you can tear the whole thing down within minutes and build another one. At the moment this looks a bit artificial. But the rocks will be full of moss, algae and lichen and weeds within a couple of years. Anyway, this is much better than the old pot.



















25 comments:

Andrija Zokic said...

Wow! Great composition, music to my ears.

Sebastijan Sandev said...

This looks ABSOLUTELY WONDERFUL. Fantastic tree and fantastic pot. Deadly combination.
I absolutely adore this pot!!!
Great great job.

Anonymous said...

Is it Magnetite?

Walter Pall said...

No, it's not any metallic sort of thing. These modules stick together by their shape.
WP

AJ said...

are those rock pieces collected? what type of stone?

Walter Pall said...

AJ,

no these are man-made. I have no clue what it is. it is not clay or cement.

WP

Ana said...

Roots will never again be extracted from the crevices of these artificial rocks, will they?

Pawel P said...

You found very good place for this tree, congratulations..

Walter Pall said...

ana,

actually it will be very easy to untangle the rootpad and get rid of all the stones if I ever want.
I wondered whether some will consider this kitsch. They don't so far. I think I will plant an edelweiss and I will place a little mountian goat on the rock. Or better not.

WP

Pawel P said...

Walter,
I have to say you show us again best sign of european naturalistic stream, Pawel

Pedro Inacio said...

Rock Lego Pots? Sounds great. :)

That's for sure the pot the tree was looking for.

Just amazing.

Ana said...

Now that you mentioned!
N'ah, no way. The pots might be a little bit, but not once they get paired with this shrubbery of yours ;) The goodness of fit seems striking from where I am standing (in front of a measly 2D shot, that is); those 'pots' are terrifically neutral - an extension of the tree. This once I hope that the 3D reality maintains this illusion. Intended?

Shaukat Islam said...

Walter,

Fantastic work!!! Pls accept my sincere felicitations on creating this wonderful composition.

The 'goiter' is gone by your great treatment. I don't know how these 'rocks' would look in reality but in the pics this definitely does NOT appear to be kitsch. Rather IMO the crescent pot that it was in earlier looks kitsch to me.

You said these rock 'modules' can be dismantled and rearranged. This is very interesting. Can you elaborate a little? And these made of synthetic polymer?

Shaukat

Walter Pall said...

Shaukat,

the base rock and the extra pieces are made of the sam stuff. It is hard and a bit heavy and brakes if you hit it hard. The extra pieces have irregular shapes with kinks and turns. You can see them in the fourth image. Thus they don't fall apart if you build a mountain with them. They will even get closer to each other over time and I can move the whole thing without any danger of the mountain falling apart ever. But in case I don't like it anymore I just take piece by piece and the mountain is gone. Dietmar Popp has invented this.
The rocks have rough surface and somewhat store humidity. Thus moss and algae will grow on them easily and stay even in the summer heat.

WP

Mario bonsai said...

Can hardly find words strong enough to admire this ...
Walter, you're an inspiration!

Wolfgang said...

F A N T A S T I C !!!!! -

The only thing i can say, Walter.

What a development! - Wonderful!!!

Wolfgang said...

F A N T A S T I C !!!!! -

The only thing i can say, Walter.

What a development! - Wonderful!!!

Wolfgang said...

Kimura like !!!

zopf said...

Hallo Walter
Vom Grundkonzept ist wohl die
Wirkung eines "Klippenhängers" angestrebt. Der linke untere Rand der Basisschale hebt den Effekt allerdings zu einem gewissen Teil wieder auf. Vielleicht ist das
Schalenmaterial brechbar und damit besser den Bedürfnissen anpassbar.
mfG Dieter

Andrey said...

Прекрасно!

Andrey said...

Прекрасно!

Walter Pall said...

Sehe ich auch so Dieter. Technisches Problem: Der Baum stützt sich auf die untere Schale, man sieht es kaum, es it aber für die Stabilität unbedingt notwendig.

WP

avicenna said...

Hello Walter,
often I was asked what happens with the surface of my rock bowls over the time went by ? I have made a post (http://natureart-bonsai.blogspot.com / 2009/09/natural-lichen-and-moss-growth-on-my.html) with many examples with natural lichen and moss growth... maybe this answers many emergent questions and underlines the innovative character of this important step towards a perfekt illusion in the naturalistic stile of bonsai...
Greetings
avicenna

Takács Gábor said...

Dear Walter!

From a what kind of substance this dish is prepared? I hope so not secret. I would say thanks for it very much if you would write it down for me because there may not be bonsai unfortunately at us to get dishes you are very much expensive.
I would like to do one like this that my trees if not too bonsaipot, but at least into dishes like this let them be.

Thank you!
With respect: Gábor Takács (Szuky,) http://www.bonsaigabi.blogspot.com

Walter Pall said...

Gabor,

I don't know the substance and the man who makes it keeps it as secret. You find this often in potting. They will never tell you a secret while in bonsai design and horticulture most secrets are revealed.

WP