Thursday, September 24, 2009

Japanese White Pine #1

This tree somehow found it's way into my garden:

Japanese White Pine, Pinus pentaphylla, around 50 years old, 70 cm high, pot: Tokaoname, imported from Japan in 2001, maintained by Mauro Stemberger, maintained by WP since September 2009

I guess one Japanese white pine and one VERY Japanese tree is fine in my collection.
It took two days to pluck all needles and to clean the trunk and surface.

First image two weeks ago in Mauro's garden. Then tow days ago and finally today and it sits on the place where the larch with the ax set.















17 comments:

Anonymous said...

If you deem the Japanese quality of this tree a handicap, I don't see any problems with turning it into a more naturalistic style. Do you think it couldn't be done?

Walter Pall said...

The Japanese quality of this pine is excellent, it is not a handicap at all. I cannot see where I can improve on that other than maintain it getting even more maturity over time.
Certainly I could restyle this and give it a naturalistic design. Why should I? I think this would be a mistake.
In the history of architecture tens of thousands of churches were restyled as the fashion trends changed. Once upon a while we find one which is still in the style of the medievals - and this is a gem.
I want to have this Japanese tree in my collection and keep it exactly as is.

WP

Ferry said...

This pine and the maple are some very nice trees from mr. Stemberger. Were they both involved in a trade wich magically involved a giant larch as well? :)

Anyhow, I think it's quite remarkable to see the most Italian/Japanese collection become a bit more naturalistic, and vice versa. Will this somehow lead to an ultimate mix between Japanese and European influences? Perhaps with European yamadori styled like a Japanese tree, or Japanese import-trees with a naturalistic touch?

Food for thought, I guess...

Ferry

Hirth Janos said...

wonderful tree ! Good work.
HJ

Hirth Janos said...

Mr Pall. Would honour I ask it if I could see my blog between regular olvsói take on my side his blog list.
With respect,his admirer.
Hirth János
Hungary

Hirth Janos said...

Mr Pall!
My Blog: http://bonsaiclubkaposvar.blogspot.com

Thank you.
HJ

Anonymous said...

Wonderful tree! But didn't you say sometime you have difficulties to keep this species healthy? Or have you now found a way to do this?

Kind regards,
Constantin

Walter Pall said...

Constantin,

yes, I said so and I am worried. We'll see.

WP

Shaukat Islam said...

Walter,

Very much appreciate your honest opinion on keeping the tree as it is. The tree is very beautiful.

As regards the 'naturalistic' styling suggestion, the writers have overlooked the fact that this tree already has a very nice composition...... and there is no point going overboard with this 'naturalistic styling' concept just for the heck of it.

Regards,
Shaukat

Ana said...

What should change if there were to be a style shift?

I am not arguing either way; it just seems to me that although changing the style of an already accomplished tree makes little sense, it is a good way of showing the distinction between styles [with technical concerns out of the way]. AND, a virtual or two could never harm a needle...

Andrija Zokic said...

Is the last photo new possible front side, maybe? Crown is wider from this point and more informal.

Anonymous said...

Hi Walter,congratulations with this old and beautifull bonsaitree.
And I hope i wil see this tree in real life for once.
Greetings Ed

Walter Pall said...

Andrija,

yes, that's the only thing that I might change next spring. I even have the suspicion that this WAS the front some time ago.

WP

AJ said...

Walter, in addition to improving the appearance, is there a benefit to the tree when you remove dead needles? Would you do this to Ponderosa as well? Thank you

Walter Pall said...

AJ,

sure there are also horticultural benefits. Light and air can get into the crown much better. Some branches halfway within the crown get light, the tree will have a tendency to back bud. The most important thing is that with plucking needles the foliage gets balanced. Meaning that larger needle pads get plucked more and in the end they are all of the same size. This will result in even size buds. The buds are smaller because of less foliage. Smaller buds will get smaller needle pads and shorter needles.
Plucking needles of pines (If they are healthy!!!) is of extreme importance to improve your trees,

WP

Anonymous said...

Walter,

I understand that you have shown that some of the traditional rigorous rules for performing care for bonsai are not necessary. I'm curious as to what you do for needle plucking. Once you have a yamadori settled for about two years, do you pluck ALL of the older growth?
Do you trim the needles to leave potential buds? Or do you pluck? Do you perform these activities on a schedule?

Walter Pall said...

Needles are plucked with two hands, not cut. Cutting is a waste of time. Only somone with two left hands will ruin too many sleeping buds. The old growth gets removed in most instances. When the new growth is small some of the old growth remains. When the new growth is very strong some of this goes too. The aim is to have all neeedle pads the same size in the end. Time: from end of July until the end of April, whenever you feel like it. I do it in July or August to ahae a good loking tree as soon as possible. On weak trees nothing gets plucked.

WP