Sunday, August 5, 2007

development of hornbeam from Croatian demo

Many have seen this demo on youtube. Some were disappointed. They could not understand why I had ended up with such an ugly tree. Well, this is very often what one has to do in bonsai to get a very good looking tree in the end. It was the purpose of the demonstration to show this.

Here the recent development. This will give you some hope. But there are still about 5 to 10 years to go.

1) tree as after the demo in Croatia
2) tree as of August 2007


15 comments:

Marko said...

It is also repoted ! Why so soon ? Isn't it too risky ?

And soil ... looks like pure sand. But it's not I imagine.

Anyway: promised tree.

Have a nice day.
Marko

Montenegrian boy said...

I'm very glad to see this tree looks better now. And also, I see that you didn't changed anything on it at your home.

Walter Pall said...

Marko,

good point. Calm down.I would never repot a hornbeam in the beginning of August nor would I think it is a good idea to do so after drastic styling. I did not repot this tree. I did what is called "slip-potting". Thereby the fully intact rootbal is placed in a new container of the same size. The tree did not even notice it was moved to a new container. The roots wer absolutely not disturbed. So why did I do this? Well, because it looks better and was not a big effort. The soil stayed the same ,of course. It was not touched. What you see is my top soil. This is the kind of substrate that I put on top for better looks. It is not sand, but baked clay.

Walter

Bogdan C. said...

Dear Mr.Pall,

I have a great respect for you and your work and art. I also want to thank you for making this blog so people can learn more!

I live in Romania and in my native region I found in a forest plenty of small hornbeams, some of them really nice looking and promising. But they have very long vertical roots, as they grow in pure yellow clay (loess), with only a thin layer of fertile soil on top. These single vertical roots seem to be much longer than the tree itself.

I'm thinking of collecting the trees in 2 stages: 1. this summer dig around the tree - without disturbing it - and cut the main root at some depth (equal to the tree's height?) then cover with soil and let it develop new finer roots in situ; 2. during the next spring lift the tree from the soil and put it in a deep training pot with Akadama mixed with some fertile soil; is this right? I really need an advice from you.

Thanks in advance!

Bogdan.

Walter Pall said...

Bogdan,

this sounds fine to me. Go ahead and do it.

Walter

Bogdan C. said...

Dear Mr.Pall,
Thank you very much!
One more thing: in spring should I take the roots with a good piece of the earth they are in, and at home put them in rainwater to loose the soil and get bare roots, or better save some original soil on the roots and add more Akadama until it fills the training pot?

Vielen dank!

Bogdan.

Walter Pall said...

Bogdan,

don't barreroot a hornbeam. The only trees that I would bareroot immediately are junipers from the J. chinensis family, like J. chinensis, scopulorum, sabina etc.

Walter

Bogdan C. said...

Thank you very much! Now thanks to the Internet and to knowledgeable specialists like you we can avoid many mistakes and loss of precious trees.

About 10 yrs ago, when I had no info regarding hornbeams, I took 2 very nice hornbeams home from the forest, almost barerooted, and they died some time after that...I remember one of them looked like a really old tree (formal upright) and even had a very small tinder fungus/amadou (probably Fomes fomentarius) on its trunk, naturally grown! Have you ever tried to grow tinder fungus on the trunk of any of your bonsai? I hope this is not a stupid question, I just think that a small tinder fungus on some trees may add something interesting :)

Thank you!

Bogdan.

Marija said...

He is alive, and progressing as we expected!
Regards from Croatia!

Anonymous said...

Walter,
Why would you not bareroot deciduous trees?
-jeremy

Walter Pall said...

jeremy,

because I believe the risk is higher than the reward. Bare rooting is done in Japan in late spring. This is then the start of a summer with very high humidity. Thus trees will recover and do well even if bare rooted. We have to repot trees in late spring and then afterwards fthree months follow with low to very low humidity and rather high temperatures. Trees are always at risk here after repotting in spring. If you repot them in fall they ar at even higher risk because winter comes much sooner here than in smost other areas. After all I live 900 miles of Toronto latitude wise. So I have to be extremely careful about most things.

Walter

Bogdan C. said...

Dear Mr.Pall,

It seems that all your hornbeams displayed on the website have very good nebari. Was that natural or you applied ground layering? I'm asking that 'cause the small hornbeams I know in the forest only have a long, straight root, no near-surface horizontal roots...

Thank you!

Bogdan.

Walter Pall said...

Bogdan,

all my nebaris are natural. Collected hornbemas here very often have good nebari. On a hornbeam I DEMAND excellent nebari. Otherwise I refuse to work on it.

Walter

Bogdan Costin said...

Dear Mr.Pall,

Me again with another dumb question :) : I found an old impressive hornbeam in the forest, but the very base of the trunk is curved - is horizontal for about 5 cm, then the trunk gets vertical...If I decide to take this hornbeam to train as Bonsai, should this horizontal part be covered with substrate or could be left visible?? What kind of pot would be appropriate for such tree, assuming one day will become a Bonsai?

I've seen a few big, normal hornbeams growing like this, but I must admit it is not a common shape for this species in the nature.

Thanks in advance!

Bogdan.

200xth said...

In case you want to see any updates on the tree(s) above since this blog entry, here are the links to each tree(s):

1) Oriental Hornbeam #1