Thursday, August 2, 2012

Hilliari elm and wild cherry

Hiiliari elm, Ulmus campestre 'Hilliari', a garden variety, pot by Peter Krebs

Wild cherry, Prunus mahaleb, pot by John Pitt.


8 comments:

crataegus said...

Hi Walter, could you please explain what hilliari elm is? I never heard of it nor can i find info on google. Offcourse i know ulmus campestris, which is the field elm or synonymus to Ulmus Minor. Also known as ulmus procera in england. Is Hilliari a variety that is nurseries in germany?

Walter Pall said...

The Hilliari elm is a variety that is offered in nurseries around the world. It is THE most famous elm strain. It is a strain of Ulmus procera as the English call it, which is a variety of Ulmus campestre and which should be named Ulmus campestre var. procera. Or not - if you don't like this forget it. It is very easy to come by as just about every nursery in moderate climate offers it but almost impossible to get good material like this. It is very difficult to make it into a bonsai and keep it for a while.

crataegus said...

ok thanks for the reply, in belgium i've never come accross 'hilliari' variety in the (usueal) nursery thats weird. Ulmus campestre var. procera. Yes ok, but to me a bit strange cause this sounds like 2 synonyms in one. Its just that i came accross a scientific article not so long ago that showed ie the Ulmus procera, so called english (field) elm, is actually genetically not different from Ulmus minor, and all english procera can be traced to this old clone that was once imported in england. But whatever, campestre is used as a synonym so why not use it.

Anonymous said...

What you call Hilliari elm is in fact properly called Ulmus × hollandica 'Hillieri', a hybrid between U. glabra and U. minor (syn. campestris).

crataegus said...

just merely as info, it is also put on Wikipedia under ulmus procera http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ulmus_procera

Walter Pall said...

About 200 years ago was the time when the world started to name nature. While the scientific naming scheme was invented by the Swede Linne the English were the absolute superower at that time. They dominated the naming like just about everything else. It was in the feeling of the time that England 'deserved' it's own elm. So U. procera was named and still exists today in books.

crataegus said...

that nicely sums it up pretty much. Greetz

Anonymous said...

Yes, but that still leaves us with the problem of perpetuating inaccurate names.