Wednesday, September 3, 2014

European spruce #79

There is no need to tell me that the pot is a bit too small. Three reasons: 1) trees grow better in samaller pots contrary to public opinion 2) it is much easier to carry for me with this pot and light substrate 3) eventuall the tree will go into the final pot without any problems and without disturbing the root ball again because the next pot will be larger. Thomas helped me to tame the beast.

























5 comments:

Magda said...

what are you doing with all these branch stubs?

Walter Pall said...

Carve teem delicately and edit them so they look like nature has made them. This is pretty much standard. The real challenge will be the top. This has to be split. I have the biggest avaialble trunk splitter. We'll see how it works. This all will happen in August 2015.

Anonymous said...

Hello Walter,

why do trees grow better in smaller pots? And what do you mean by "better"? Faster or higher quality, like shorter internodes, finer root system...

All the best
Andy

Walter Pall said...

Andy, big tree nurseries around the world work on millions of trees. They spend tons of money every year to get the trees from smaller pots into larger ones. Why are they wasting their money? They could plant the small trees right into the large containers and then just wait until the trees are big. Are nureie folks stupid? Common sense and conventional wisdom mislead you.

Anonymous said...

Problem of economy & hesitancy to move towards newer growing methods, in my experience. Most nursery folk aren't willing to pay higher prices for better draining mixes, especially since the consumer is usually going to take your mix with them out the door. Because of this, most mixes are high in cheap organics, and will eventually drown a small plant's roots. If I'm going for maximum growth rate in my (non-bonsai) trees, I'm going to be using lots of root-pruning at a young age to develop a nice, fibrous root system. The easiest way to do this on a large scale is some sort of air pot, which prunes the roots for you. Since I want this to happen very quickly after germination, I'm going to seed into very shallow, bottomless containers, then slightly larger air pots, then into gallon-pots, which is the first size most of the public is willing to buy. If I do all this, I can have a salable tree at the end of the first year, from seed. Unfortunately, few nurseries use such techniques. A notable one that does in the US is Forrest Keeling.

Just sharing a slightly different perspective. JBM