Tuesday, May 14, 2013

Japanese maple #11

The hedge pruning method at work. Now the maple will stay like this until beginning of August. Then I will cut the upper part again and also the lower part. This will resutl in the lower parts becoming much stronger and in much better ramification overall in the long run.

 

4 comments:

Marc said...

Did you get any criticism from the international bonsai world on your hedge pruning method? It's awefully quiet out there....

Walter Pall said...

Oh sure, because they don't understand that any method can ONLY be judged by long term results. Look at my gallery!
This tree here was shown on Kokufu Ten and Noelanders Trophy. Do you think I would not use the traditional methods on it if I thought they are better?

Marc said...

First of all; I never fully understood why the traditional method is/was so great. With that, I mean the leaf pinching and to prune everthing new on a tree. I did leaf pinching on a maple for many years and I can say: the tree looks horrible. Many twigs and the tree doesn't look like a tree, but like a weird shrub. While I cut everthing new on a tree, they looked very tired and never finished. I'm glad that I stepped out of that world. I don't own finished bonsai, so why would I treat my trees like if they are finished? I'm still a little embarrassed for that.

Even my old bonsai "master" finds it strange that I'm using the hedge pruning method on my zelkova. He says that's not the bonsai way! Ha!

japanesebonsaipots.net said...

I totally agree with you Walter, we're talking horticultural science here, not art, and repeatable results are the only thing that matters. I do, however, think that we should note that this is exactly how finished bonsai are pruned in Japan: anything extending outside the silouette is removed, inner buds are allowed to grow. I know where these foolish and misapplied myths originate, but I wonder why anyone follows them? Religious like dogma?