Wednesday, May 8, 2013

cherry #21

wild cherry, Prunus cerasifera, pot by Josef Mairhofer


 

6 comments:

Anonymous said...

Walter,

A quick question. I have a cherry tree that had been cut back some time ago, at least over two years ago by a prior owner. THe base is probably 5 inches across and the tree tapers to about 3 over about a foot and a half high. I think that it would be nice to add to my collection but I'm unsure if something like this can be pulled from the ground for bonsai if it's spent it's entire life in the earth?

Would you recommend digging a rootball around it and just using a power tool to cut the tap root?

Walter Pall said...

Sure, sounds like the tree can be collected.

Anonymous said...

Walter,

What a surprise! The root flare was probably close to a foot. After digging around the tree more I found much more than I expected. The smaller feeder roots near the tree were not too terribly many and I had to cut the very large roots that extended for very far.

In your experience does cherry do well to recover from such work or are they very picky? Also, i put the tree in pure pumice and will keep a very good eye on the moisture and water very often. Is there anything else you suggest? Feed the tree/ avoid feeding, full sun, shade?

Thank you for your help!

Walter Pall said...

Cherry trees can well survive such treatment. Everything like always: lots of water, often, lots of feeding, often, lots of nitrogen, often, full sun.

Anonymous said...

I've noticed that your Cherry/Prunus look very much like your regular bonsai as far as branch structure. That's very much in contrast to what I see on the internet coming from Japan where they are very leggy- or have very long branches. I have found a few places that explain that that's routine there because cherry don't back bud.

I'm curious about why your cherry / prunus trees shape so differently than those in Japan? Do you have any thoughts on that?

Thank you,
Gerald

Walter Pall said...

Gerald, I start with old material from the wild and prune it back hard. The Japanese don't do this. They don't collect broadleaved trees from the wild.