Monday, September 6, 2010

Ezo spruce show ready

Ezo spruce, Picea jezoensis. This is one of three trees that I will bring to the "30 best bonsai in in Europe" in October to Mulhouse in France. When I chose this one I thought that i would exhibit it with all the wire on. Well, It would not have been as nice as it could be but I thought that the wire could still stay on until September 2011. Then the branches would be fixed for quite a few years. You can leave wire on old spruces for two or three years. When you take it off hey will go back a bit and ignore the new shape. Anyway, this was my thinking. But then I thought that if it really should be exhibited as one of '30 best bonsai in Europe' I must do a bit more. So I took off the wire and thought that I would have had to partially rewire it again. But now it looks great without wire and I will show it just like this in France Before it will go into the BMW exhibit which starts next week again.
Last image as of May 2008.

5 comments:

Anonymous said...

Isn't it a bit sparse, especially in the second photo?

Walter Pall said...

The overwhelming majority of bonsai in exhibts have way to dense foliage. It is essential that such a tree which is supposed to look natural has little foliage to look good. This tree shold never have more foliage than it has now.

Walter Pall said...

The first and second image are the tree in exactly the same state. Only the background is different. There is 5 minutes in between the photographs. A tree looks much denser with a black background and much more sparse with a white background. This is an optical illusion.
Trust me, in reality it is just fine.

Anonymous said...

Healthy spruces in nature should have so much foliage that one shouldn't be able to see through the canopy.

With bonsai, on the other hand, if one strives to make the trunk and thicker branches more apparent, one should do that in an obvious way, by completely removing the blocking foliage and not by making the overall appearance sparse.

In my opinion, of course.

Anonymous said...

Healthy spruces in nature are dense at the top and sparse lower. This is due to apical dominance. The branches on the lower part of the tree tend to grow down and are bare except for the ends as the rest is shaded. This has nothing to do with health, just growth habit. Spruce do not have the tolerance for shade that some broad-leaf trees do, and drop the needles that are not photosynthesizing. I think Walter has done a good job of reflecting this habit. The tree in the last picture is too dense to be a full-sized, mature tree, and would either be grazed contstantly or young and immature. If you want a naturally more dense spruce look into dwarf alberta spruce, which is just a genetic mutation and not actually "natural". Make your bonsai look like a tree, don't make your tree look like a bonsai.