Tuesday, April 20, 2010

mugo #14

Mugo pine, Pinus mugo, collected by Peter Thali, styled since October 2006 by WP. Potted today into a pot by Matteusz Grobelny from Poland.
My wife said that the pot is the end of civilization. That's a good reason to dare it.
The crown is still in early development, of course. It will edited considerably within the next years.


13 comments:

Anonymous said...

How does one water a tree in such a pot? And, more importantly, how does one repot it?

Walter Pall said...

Oh, that's a challenge. one pours water over it. and one takes it out of the pot and puts it back again. Where is the problem? And btw such trees are not repotted for 20 to 30 years anyway.

WP

TpaBayFlyFisher said...

Walter, I love your work on the tree, that planting angle makes it so dramatic. But, I agree with your wife on the pot!

tim said...

"My wife said that the pot is the end of civilization"

it can end , i love pots like that , Walter was it specially made for the tree ?

Walter Pall said...

Tim,

no, it was not made for this specific tree. I actually very rarely commission a pot for a specific tree. I purchase pots that I will most probably use for some unspecified tree. So I got together hundreds and hundreds of good pots. It is great to have a choice.

WP

Constantin said...

"And btw such trees are not repotted for 20 to 30 years anyway."

Wow! Does the organic stuff (peat?) you add to your substrate mix last that long?

Walter Pall said...

No, it decomposes after two to five years. This why I try to avoid it altogether with such trees.

WP

Constantin said...

Ah. Sorry for yet another question: So you use pure baked clay?

Walter Pall said...

In this case I used bake d clay. Could have been pumice or lava or styropor flakes or any other modern substrate or a mixture. But certainly no fine particles and absolutely no soil. It does not matter. When will folks start to believe me??? Forget all soil information that is in your books!

Constantin said...

Oh, I do believe you. I actually tried modern substrate without organic addition last year, but I didn't really manage to water that pot sufficiently. Maybe it was still too small to go entirely without organic stuff. Seems like I'm getting on the track eventually. Thank you for your advice!

Anonymous said...

Where is the problem?

The problem, as it appears to me, is that the top opening of the pot is narrower than the container itself and that could cause dry pockets in the soil at the bottom edge.

The same reason (narrow opening) could make it hard to take the plant out. Well, one could just stick a knife in and cut through the soil, including the roots while the tree is still in its pot but that is a bit awkward if not potentially damaging to the tree.

And about those 20 to 30 years until repotting... Well, I guess it could be done, but I bet the tree would look kind of brown ;-) at the end of that period.

Walter Pall said...

OK, thank you for your opinion. But why is it that I do not see a problem at all. You are worrying about the wrong things. It is not a problem at all. You are just wrong because you don't have the experience.

Arzivenko said...

People must stop guessing the problems, and see it on the
practice. Its easy to find the "failures" without even
trying the method.