Thursday, October 15, 2009

new mugo

This is a mugo pine, Pinus mugo which was collected in Switzerland a few years ago. It is around 150 years old and very healthy. The tree is about 1 meter high or rather long. It does not look like much in the position it is the pot it is now. But if i put it upright it can well be a very good bonsai. Or so I think. I got this in a trade and it will go to the collection eventually. I am thinking of possibly using this one for demonstration at Noelanders Trophy 2010. We'll see.






10 comments:

Don McCarthy said...

Hard to see with the weeds; but the nebari look quite fine.

Ana said...

Is it too early to guess the future front? Each image seems to be 'missing' something worth seeing...

Walter Pall said...

Well there is a reason why I got this in the trade. It is hard to see the real quality and therefore it is an excellent piece for a demonstration. I think it is very good. We'll see.
The nebari is covered with soil. I expect to dig for gold.

WP

Anonymous said...

I believe it has got some great potential and I have no doubts that you will be able to reveal its beauty in the years to come. Looking forward to the follow up photos,

//Ken (Denmark)

AJ said...

Mr. Pall,
What time of year is the best for branch pruning on a collected pine? Is fall the best in your opinion?

I would like to remove a LARGE branch that would effectively reduce the foliage by more than 50%. It has been in a container for 1 year.

thank you!

Walter Pall said...

AJ,

I cut branches all year round. It might be better to do so in late spring though.

WP

Anonymous said...

hi Walter,

you sound so sure in estimating the age of 150 years old (or so). How do you really estimate this? do you have any material for comparison? really you could only tell from comparising equally big and thick dead trees that are still in the area, on the mountain, but simply 'dead'. That way one could 'cut' it and count the year rings. That is the only way to have a good comparison, because I have collegues at work who are into the scientific research and study for real endimic (genetic pure) species of trees and plants and they found that in many cases the age of very big trees that are estimated very old, many times are quite different from age. I only mean to say, one should be very careful in estimating and the tendency is that people really estimate wrongly, or based on not exactly the correct bases.

Walter Pall said...

Sure we have plenty of dead trees to compare. They must be of similar origin and similar growing conditions. More than 50 % of collected trees die rather soon. So there is no problem to get comparison material. As a rule of thumb 10 cm diameter means 80 to 120 year rings. This tree has more than 20 cm diameter. So I think I can be pretty confident when I estimate the age of this one.

WP

Walter Pall said...

Sure we have plenty of dead trees to compare. They must be of similar origin and similar growing conditions. More than 50 % of collected trees die rather soon. So there is no problem to get comparison material. As a rule of thumb 10 cm diameter means 80 to 120 year rings. This tree has more than 20 cm diameter. So I think I can be pretty confident when I estimate the age of this one.

WP

Ken Krogholm said...

Walter,
Just a thought - I believe there is a tendency of making the designs of many of the collected mugos very vertical - almost to an extend that seems unlikely to find - on top of the chilly and windy mountains - where 'keeping your head low' could meen the difference between life and death. I like the the second picture from above - and think this creeping design would fit this particular tree very well.
Regards from Ken