Sunday, November 13, 2011

Oriental hornbeam #2

Oriental hornbeam, Carpinus orientalis. collected in 2009, first styling in April 2010. Only 19 months later it looks presentable already. This species is great stuff!

A few years ago I was insulted when i posted images of real trees in pots. They called it Pallsai to show how odd this was. Thank you for the term. I will from now on use it for such trees.









17 comments:

Maros said...

This tree is simply great. I like it a lot. Very naturalistic :)

Anonymous said...

I love the shape of this tree. I'm curious about your thoughts on the drastic taper between the finest branches and the level before them.

Walter Pall said...

Well, this problem will be solved within fourty years.
No kidding.
Such is serious bonsai.

Walter Pall said...

Well, this problem will be solved within fourty years.
No kidding.
Such is serious bonsai.

Anonymous said...

Have to agree, the photoshop of the tree growing seemingly in nature makes it look like a tree which has had all it's branches chopped in previous years due to overhead powerlines. Food for thought, is a naturalistic tree still naturalistic when man management is involved?

Marc said...

Wow, imagine that the "old" books taught me that it takes 10 to 15 years to grow a tree from rough material to this point. What a great piece of work. I am stunned...
Is this the result of your watering, feeding and substrate topic?

Walter Pall said...

Marc,
it has to do with my horticultural regime. But it has mainly to do with the species. This is one of the best species for bonsai.

Marc said...

Maybe a bit off topic, but what do you consider the most best deciduous tree species for bonsai? My allround favorite, is still the Chinese elm, despite it's low frost tolerance. And the hornbeam, of course.

Walter Pall said...

Marc,

Acer palmatum, Acer burgerianum, Carpinus orientalis

Marc said...

Ah I see. But what if I only want to work with tree species that are growing in Northern Europe? With Northern, I mean: Netherlands, Germany etc. Surely, there must be more species that can be trained as a bonsai with some ease? I have bad experiences with oakes, onfortunaly.

Walter Pall said...

Oriental hoenbeams grow well in northern Europe. Oaks and beech are NOT winter hardy in bonsai pots. Hornbeams need a little protection.

Marc said...

Oaks are not winter hardy in pots? That's strange. The old books always said how hard and tough the oaks were. Thank you for the valuable lesson. No more maples for me, they always died of that strange fungal sickness. You mentioned only the oriental hornbeam. Is the Betulus specie not that suitable for bonsai?

Walter Pall said...

Oaks (Quercus) as well as beech (fagus) have big problems when the roots freeze. Betulus (birch) is absolutely NOT a good bonsai species. Carpinus in general is.

Marc said...

I never knew that these species weren't suitable for bonsai. Of course, oaks and beech are good if you can store them in winter, right? I think that I will give the trident maple another chance. Thank you for the info. Back on topic. :)

Anonymous said...

Walter, Hi! I am interested to know why you don't think birches are good as bonsai?
They are winter hardy(i have both silver and downy that have survived -19). The leaves reduce well and branches are relatively supple. The main drawback I can think of is that large wounds don't heal well, but such wounds can be avoided in the right material. If I remember correctly you have some in your collection, is that right? If so, are they doing badly?

Aaron said...

Hi. sorry meant to include my name, not anonymous! With regards the comment about birches as unsuitable bonsai material. Aaron.

Walter Pall said...

Birches are lousy bonsai material. They hate to be bonsai, don't bud back into old wood, drop branches or trunks without rason, hate to be wired.
Birches are bitches.
They are good for an affair but not to marry. Dont fuss around with them.