Thursday, September 8, 2011

air layer successful

This is an ash maple, acer negundo that Walter got for cheap because it was so long and ugly. The nebari was about the worst ever seen. so it was air layered on April 19, 2011 as the first images show. Yesterday we took a close look and decided to repot right away. See the nice new well proportioned tree that Walter now has.























10 comments:

Anonymous said...

Hello Mr Pall,

Very many roots have emerged from that air layer and many thanks for sharing this with us. I would like to know whether the lower part that is in the original pot would be grown on and the chances of it becoming a bonsai with no foliage at this time of the season. Also, what is the after care that will be given to the new tree? Position, watering, feeding etc. I have tried air layering before but have found the after care to be challenging especially with a poor root system. Please inform us of your methods. Thank you.

regards

Walter Pall said...

The lower part will throw new shoots next spring for sure. It might start to do so even this year. It will become a second bonsai with lousy nebari. Possibly air layered again.

The new tree will be trated just like any other tree that gets repotted at this time. Water and feed immadiately, full sun and good winter protection. Business as usual.

Bonsai said...

Thanks for sharing. Can I ask what soil mix you used?

Walter Pall said...

The exact soil mix does NOT matter as long as it is modern substrate. Just google.

Anonymous said...

Hello Mr Pall,

Thank you for your response to my question on caring for the air layer. I have a few more questions. I see that your assistant is a tall man and has relatively large hands. From the image of him grabing the air layer to prepare it, the trunk looks very thick. From horticultural books on propagation by this method the ideal size for an air layer would be much much smaller than the tree in the picture. Your results are very impressive. So, in your experience and knowledge what do you think is the largest diameter a trunk can be for a successful air layer? please make mention of japanese maples in your answer with regards to when would be the ideal time to start the process of air layering a side branch of a field grown mature tree of about 4 metres tall. Thank you very much.

Kind regards

Walter Pall said...

Olives or ficus can be air layered with a diameter of over one meter.
Japaense maples can be air layered with a diameter of ten cm or more (four inches).
Ideal time is just before the buds open until about two weeks after they have opened. This would be in my area about middle of April.
Find the thread in this blog in April 2011 where I write more about this.

Anonymous said...

is there any chanced of success to air layer needle tree like pinus or juniperus etc.? if so when is the best time?

Walter Pall said...

Pines is very difficlut to hopeless. Junipers are very easy. Best time spring, like April.

Jerry said...

Is that fresh sphagnum moss you used (i.e. green and not brown)?

Does it matter?

Walter Pall said...

That came directly out of the edge of my pond. Does it matter? I don't know. Maybe.