Thursday, May 24, 2012

Prunus mahaleb improved

Prunus mahaleb, wild cherry, collected in 2011 in Italy. this one is avaiable for sale or trade.


7 comments:

Anonymous said...

why do many deciduous hollows extend down the length of the tree? I see this in nature, but I also see hollows that extend down within the trunk, and blind hollows.

-Dave

Walter Pall said...

Because that is how trees grow and get old. They are eventually all dead in the core. And then the core will eventually start to rot. EVERY large old broadleaved tree is hollow inside after many years. It does not kill the tree at all. It does not even hurt him.

Anonymous said...

But why do your hollows extend down the whole EXTIRIOR of the trunk?

-Dave

Walter Pall said...

Well that's entirely an artistic decision. Because otherwise the trunk would be just fat and boring.
In Japan this would never be done. That's a good reason to do it.

Marc said...

Walter, are you using anu kind of jin seal to preserve the wood? I did a same kind of thing on a zelkova and was wondering what you are using.

Walter Pall said...

Preserving the wood in this case is NOT what we want. We wnat it to decay very quickly and get a good patina. This will only happen if you do NOTHING. Just wait for one yeasr. Then one could apply the torch carefully and later a strong steel brush to get natural structure. And afterwards you do NOTHING. After ten years this looks very creidible old an natural. Then you apply wood hardener once every summer to fix the state. do NOT apply lime sulphur on a broadleved tree. Nothing looks more unnatural than white deadwood in a hollow trunk.

Marc said...

Glad to hear this. I really was considering to mix the lime sulphur with some black ink. Now, I will leave the tree alone. Thanks again for the info. The Prunus looks great btw.