Monday, July 26, 2010

New trees at Nature's Way Nursery

These are SOME of the new trees at nature's Way Nursery. They are ONLY available in the USA. Export is impossible. Speak to Jim Doyle if you are seriously interested. Some of these trees may not be available anymore. These are Rocky Mountiain Junipers, Juniperus scopulorum, Ponderosa pines, Pinus ponderosa, Douglas fir, Pseudotzuga menziesi, Egelman spruce, Picea englemanni etc. All very old to ancient. Some way over 1,000 (one thousand) years old. Prices according to quality.
Go to gallery pines and other
and junipers for exact number. Mention the first five digits to Jim Doyle and he will give you availability and price.

10 comments:

Alex Probst said...

Amazing!

Anonymous said...

Walter,

indeed amazing trees but please, dont exagerate the age too much. They are whithout a doubt very old, some certainly maybe a few hundred years, but anything over 3 to 400 years i would not dare to say. Please be very careful to say a thousand years. I know my way in basic plant and tree knowledge and can quite comfortly say that you would deserve a science award or be in the book of records if any of the shown trees is in fact really a thousand years old. Maybe one can be sacrificed for science purpusos to find out because this would be worth world news in magazines. There are also other things that make it almost impossible, 1 of those thoughts is that the slopes on the rocky's also evolve in time (erosion and so on) that it makes it quite impossible that such smaller trees or shrubs survive a thousand years on the exact same location without ever getting killed (weather, rocks erosion, and all other circumstances). Also the effect of those things has a bigger impact on those smaller trees and shrubs than on bigger mature and settled trees that have also the protection around them (in woods and so). Anyway, surviving a thousand years in that same spot on a slope in the rocky's, and in that size...almost impossible.

Walter Pall said...

It is obvious that you have not done what I have done several times: cutting a dead one, polishing the surface and count the rings with a microscope. One had more thtn 2,000 /two thousand) year rings. Four to six inches on a Rocky Mountain Juniper from rugged areas means around 1,000 years. Two inches on a gnarlded pondrosa pine usually mean 250 years. No need to exaggerate. I am estimating the age DOWN to remain credible. If you had done what I have done you would know that my estimates are very conservative.
WP

Andrija Zokic said...

Anonymous, look at this smaller tree or shrub on same location:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-1237973/Worlds-oldest-plant-13-000-year-old-oak-survives-cloning-itself.html

Walter Pall said...

Look at this:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/04/080416104320.htm

Dre Cast said...

this is often referred to as walking trees as branches root and grow they often die at the main root and repeat this process for hundreds and even thousands of years you can sometimes find skeletons of beautiful deadwood behind these trees. so its very possible and its happening right now. you just need to do more research and walk around harsh living areas to witness this.

Anonymous said...

Walter, can you please post this picture of you cutted and polished wood with the year rings. I still find it hard to believe, withoudt actually seeing what you describe :-)

Anonymous said...

other thing forgotton to say: the articles posted show indeed some amazing finds, but thats why they are in magazines. The ones posted here as bonsai cannot simply be seen the same just because of that article. In fact those finds on the rocky's would also be so rare that they would be published. Also the tree on the article show obviously a superlarge rootsystem very much older than the tree itself. I dont see evidence of that in the bonsai depicted here, or the must be only parts fros the original root system still there?

Anonymous said...

the article about the 13000 year old clone is super interesting, but in fact a little different. In the article we can perfectly understand that all the living trees visible today were not around 13000 years ago. It is indeed very acceptable and true about the other info given. Also this is research which is also carried out to find out the genetical authenticity of trees per ecodistrict. This is current research done in many european countries right now. The same story as with this oak happens for example with tree forest that were historically used long time for would (broom sticks, tools...) since middle ages. Also here the centure wood dies out or is chopped for use every some years, and year after year, century after century the total tree system grows wider because alltime new shoots must grow back from the original old root system. This is still different from saying that the group of visible trees alive now, are in fact for example as old as the original tree (lets say 2000 years). This is about this article i mean. The trees walter show must really (the visible living tree) hundreds to thousands year old. This can be, but super rare. Walter shows us indeed some very old wood choppings with the year rings mentioned.

AK said...

Anonymous,

It is true that the Rockies are deteriorating, but there are plateaus and cliff faces in the Rockies that are quite stable. Many of the best trees come from these plateaus. Certainly a few thousand years is just a blink of an eye in the geological time of the rockies. I think you are underestimating the size of the Northern Rockies. You cannot make generalizations that all slopes in the rockies are crumbling away.

These barren cliffs and plateaus are ideal for supporting little old trees. There are hardly any fires there because the vegetation is so sparse. Fire is the #1 thing that keeps conifers from getting old. Its not like everywhere in the rockies is just constantly crumbling apart. Weather is not so much a problem. If they survive 100 years of hellish weather, whats to stop them from surviving several hundred more? THey just have to stay small.

Even the little 50 foot high granite cliffs near my house have well documented thousand year old Thuja trees. They hang out looking over the busiest highway in North America. http://www.flickr.com/photos/peterkelly1/390767197/

I do not claim to be an expert in this field, but I have read quite a bit on the topic. Thousand year old trees are relatively common in the rockies.

And proving that some of walters trees are at millenium status wont be big news or get anyone any scientific recognition. Its just not that big a deal. I would not be surprised at all if his big RMJ at natures way, or Jason Gamby's big RMJ are near or past 1000 years. But as Walter said - who cares, right? They are nice trees, period. :)