Sunday, September 1, 2013

New great spruces

Many people slow down with their bonsai collection after they are 60 years old. Many reduce the collection and some give up. I do the contrary (as so often). I speed up the additions. Here six new European spruces, Picea abies. I must have a lot to work within the next twenty years, at least. These trees will require a great deal of work. They were all collected in the Alps in spring of 2013. By now one can see whether they will make it or not. These all look very happy, already have lots of good buds for next year. They will now be left as they are. I gave them a big feeding shot with a couple handful of chicken do pellets each. They will overwinter without protection and next summer I can start to do some serious stuff with them. This will be mostly uncovering the nebaris and deadwood work. Serious bending will start to happen in 2015. I hardly can wait and feel like this child at Christmas. Many will see that they are big but will not see the potential. Just trust me, these are top treess. Every single one has the potential to become a really good and famous bonsai. I will report the progress, of course.


 

6 comments:

Steve Moore said...

Maybe I shouldn't joke about stealing anything -- not after the thefts you've suffered -- so I'll just say that I'd be pleased beyond measure to have that first tree to work on. Love that trunk taper and movement!

As for the "speeding up after 60," I'm with you! (Now to just convince my wife that it will help keep me young and vigorous.)

Prakti said...

Just stunning! These trees are part of the wetest dreams a bonsai artist can have. Got no other words for that! So when you come to a age refusing to take such beautys, be allert!!! ... and give me a call, i will take them all. :-)

Marc said...

The first tree looks very impressive. A literati perhaps?

davekirkland said...

What type of soil were they growing in? - was it a big risk to put very old trees (judging by the bark) in such small pots immediately?

Walter Pall said...

Dave,

they grew on granite rocks. It was not a big risk at all. They have such small root balls in nature. The smallest possible contiainer is the best for collected trees- not only spurces. They grow much better in smaller containers than in big boxes. Most amateurs do the contrary. I have collected more than 500 spruces in my life so far.

davekirkland said...

Thankyou, again you save me many years of learning this for myself.