Wednesday, September 4, 2013

INTERNATIONAL BONSAI ACADEMY with Walter Pall 2013 - Case Study 6/ Picea...

10 comments:

Anonymous said...

Walter

I have the deepest respect and admiration for your advancements in the Bonsai art. But of all your innovations, you cannot claim first using candelabra form in Bonsai. Very sorry

-Dave

Walter Pall said...

Dave,

so why is it that I remember very well to have been accused of obnoxious bonsai taste in 1984, when I first showed a larch in candelabra form at the German Convention?

Walter Pall said...

In art there is ALWAYS someone who did something before. This is not the point. All that matters is who made an impact. The one who introduced something that found followers and that later on became a standard is the key.The others get forgotten, even if they were earlier.

Anonymous said...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goshin


"Goshin first took shape as a forest planting around 1964. Inspired by a forest of Cryptomeria japonica near a shrine in Japan, Naka first combined the four trees he had already developed into a single, 4-foot-tall (1.2 m) composition.[2][3] He soon added three more, to create a seven-tree forest bonsai. Naka also had to modify the pot to ensure adequate drainage—the lack of which caused one of the trees, and its repeated replacements, to die. At the time, Naka had seven grandchildren, each of which was represented by a tree. At the urging of fellow bonsai artists, he named his composition; he called the bonsai "Goshin", meaning "protector of the spirit", in reference to the forest shrine that inspired it. By 1973, Naka had eleven grandchildren, and he augmented Goshin concordantly."

Daniel Dolan said...

Mr. Pall:

Your conversational critiques in the form of these short videos are very insightful, helpful and funny.

Like your trees with several fronts......these discussions offer views to technique, aesthetics, horticulture, habitat and more.

Looking forward to Larch, Birch, Mugo Pine.....

Best regards,
D/D
Chicago

Walter Pall said...

What exactly has Goshin to do with this thread?

Daniel Dolan said...

Mr. Pall:

Short follow up question......

When asked about the show worthiness of this tree you commented that it needed a bit more "maturity" in your view.

As this tree has strong trunks, aged bark, distinctive deadwood.......what else would you be looking for in its development so that it has an image of greater maturity?

Regards,

D/D
Chicago

Anonymous said...

The date, 1964-1973. Goshen is comprised entirely of candelabra trees.
Maybe I am misunderstanding the style, however. We do not need to discus this further if you wish; I am not here for an argument, and I can accept if I am wrong.

I also agree with Daniel, I really appreciate the videos, and I should have started by saying this.
-Dave

Walter Pall said...

Daniel, the branches too much look like someone has styled them and that someone was not nature. This will get better by itself, just let the tree grow slowly. After a couple of years it will look like it was never touched by man.

Walter Pall said...

Dave, interesting that you mention this. Candelabra has nothing to do with Goshin.
I remember well around 1985 in a workshop with John Naka a lady wanted to do something in the direction of candlabra tree. John clearly said that this is NOT possible. This was strictly against the rules. He forced her to undo her styling. I found this most astounding as I knew that John in his books did a lot of natural trees which he edited a bit and placed them in pots. I had assumed that he was serious about naturalistic style. I could not understand why he wold not accept a most natural tree form for a bonsai.