Sunday, February 6, 2011

Hawthorn #6

European hawthorn, Crataegus monogyna, collected in fall of 2008. First image of April 2009. In February 2011 it got the first serious styling. The tree will be left alone for two vegetation periods. Only the long new growth will be cut back by beginning of August. In two years we will probably have to take off all the wire and see it from there. This is quite thorny. Therefore the wiring is not all neatly done. My hands look like a was in a fight with my hands with a lynx.
I am happy about this tree and look forward to develop it over the next ten years.






















7 comments:

Al Polito said...

Well done. I like this kind of hawthorn because the small lobed leaves and fissured bark create help give it the image of an old California (and perhaps English) oak. That is, if you can minimize the species' natural straightness, which you've done here.

Pavel Slovák said...

Hi Walter. A very beautiful yamadori tree. The first styling looks very good. I look forward to spring photo.

Pavel Slovák

Maple Bonsai said...

You really did a great job with this tree. This is one amazing hawthorn bonsai. I like hawthorns since they're unique and lovely in a special way. Thank you for sharing these lovely pictures of your great work.

Lucian Vlad said...

From a specific angle the two main trunks form a square. I think that this must be hided somehow in time.

northumbrian dave said...

What size was the rootball taken in 2008, and have you cut roots since?

Walter Pall said...

The rootball was just about the size of the pot. It went into the pot right away. This kind of collected tree will NOT be touched as long as possible. This means that I will develop this tree for the next five years or more and not touch the roots. Then it will go into the final pot which will be about the size again. So the roots will not be touched then. There are many big misunderstandings about cutting roots. Try to avoid it a s long as possible.
WP

Anonymous said...

Like the way you have pruned each trunk - they have the same rhythm which creates a sense of unity in the two trunks.