Monday, January 21, 2008

re-styling of a needle juniper #4

After deciding about the final outline of the crown, burning deadwood, brushing deadwood, working on live vains with sand paper, repotting.
These are just working pictures to see what we have got now. The final portrait pictures will be made within the next days when the light is just right.
It looks like the result is better than the virtual. This rarely happens. I wonder what the owner will say when he sees his tree.



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9 comments:

James said...

I think it needs to fill in a little. Something in between the "now" and the virtual would be nice.

What I really wanted to ask was this: is there a difference between Juniperus rigida and Juniperus communis regarding life expectancy as bonsai?

Yannick said...

Hello Mr. Pall,

I have a question about repotting: Don't we have a bad time at the moment for repotting bonsais? Or is it okay for Juniperus rigida to be repotted now?

Yannick

Walter Pall said...

James,

I actually like this sparse look. For my taste most of the conifer bonsai are way to dense. Many look like poodles. I would take out more than 50 % of the green of most famous conifer bonsai. If they let me :-)

This sort of sparse look brings out the trunk and makes this tree look old. The deadwood goes together with a crown that is not TOO healthy. Anyway, if one does not like the sparse look just do nothing for a year and it will be fine for you.

The life expectancy of a needle juniper in a pot seems to be better than for a common juniper.

Walter

Walter Pall said...

yannuik,

sure it is a bad time for most folks. This particular tree happes to sit in a greenhouse which does not freeze. So it is alright in this case. In general I would suggest to NOT repot now but wait until April or even May.
I tried to touch the rootball as little as possible.

Walter

Aaron said...

Walter, thanks for these great stories... better than most published bonsai articles.

I must admit when I saw the virtual I was not too impressed as, yes, the crown looked a bit too dense.

But when I clicked on the last page I was really blown away... I think you did some seriously great work here. The owner is probably going to be knocked on his a-s when he sees it!

Congratulations, nice work.

blazing said...

Hey Mr. Pall,

Again an impressive work of yours. As to me, now the tree tells a story of its hard but a long life.
By the way, thanks for such a great blog. The blog itself and all the artworks inside are so rare and valuable.

Good day,
Emre Durdar

Leila said...

I love your site, it is a great inspiration. The comments on a trees development are especially useful.

I would like to ask- Would scots pine airlayer/root from an area of mature bark? I have found a nice tree except it is too tall.

Many thanks Leila

Walter Pall said...

leila,

forget it, I think it will ot work with scots pines. Mugo pines in the bogs do air laer themsleves though.

Walter

Yannick said...

Okay Mr. Pall,

thank you for answering and for posting these great articles.

Yannick