Wednesday, November 4, 2015

Japanese maple #1






13 comments:

Anonymous said...

Seriously, Walter, how many times have you said that before? You seem to want to turn peoples views away from those straight branches (or subtrunks, whatever you want to call them) to a fictitious difference between eastern and western taste. Well, regardless of the aura, they will, unless you actually do something radical to them, stay straight. I don't think that bonsai is an art (or craft) of hiding the faults. Having said that, I don't think that this tree is mediocre. I think it's very good. But, sadly, because of those faults, it will never be a masterpiece. Which brings me to something similar: do you, Walter, think that "Goshin" (in its present form) is a masterpiece?

Mark

Walter Pall said...

Markm
you obviously are not aware that the notion that straight trunks are bad is a typical 'bonsai' notion which is not at all shared by painters who know nothing about bonsai. You take 'bonsai aesthetics' for universal and are not aware that is iust a taste that can be changed. Why do you think that a taste that was brought to us by Asian gardeners should apply to my trees here in Europe? Why do you judge a tree with bonsai rules?

Goshin is a masterpiece because it was created by a master and is accepted as a major masterpiece in the bonaai community. You may imply that something with obvious `faults` can not possibly be a masterpiece. So who decides what a fault is? You or the artist? What a great artist does is good, regardless of what your rules say.

bottasegreta said...

Has the potting angle changed recently? It looks different....

Walter Pall said...

Yes, I have tilted the tree slightly to the left. Thus it does not appear as static anmore and has a clear movement to the left.

Chris said...

"It certainly is not the best maple around" -- so which ones are better?

One thing i like to do when looking at a bonsai is to imagine myself becoming the same scale as the tree and being able to sit at its roots, or walk around it, or climb up the trunk. Usually my favorite trees are the ones where it is easiest to imagine doing this. This tree looks very climbable, so would probably be very popular with the children. It's also a good way to forget the rules and to start looking for the character or story of a tree. If this tree really did become full size, I don't think the kids climbing up the trunk, or the people having a picnic in its shade, would complain about the position of the trunks or branches.

I know you sometimes have similar ideas, with your fairytale style, and your photoshops of bonsais onto real landscapes (or photoshops of large field trees into a virtual bonsai pot).

Anyway, i like this tree.

You know, if you really want to start correcting the stubborn rules of the bonsai books, you should write your own. The front cover could be of a tree that breaks all the rules but everyone still loves.

Marco Giai-Coletti said...

I love this tree! It looks like a tree.

Anonymous said...

Hi walter, the angle change is definitely an improvement. I like this tree more and more, everytime I see it. I have always loved the pot with this tree as well.

Walter Pall said...

Well, Mark, this is your opinion and you ahve to live with it. In your eyes it is not a masterpiece. I never said it is a masterpiece. So what. It is what it is. Probably the most famous maple bonsai. But not a masterpiece. This will add to it's aura.

Anonymous said...

Most famous in which context? That is... where? Blogspot is not the entire bonsai world. Seriously, the most important things going on in bonsai world are well separated from the internet. And from the West.

As far as adding to the aura: I'm glad I could help.

Matt Williams said...

It is somewhat amusing to hear Mark's critique of "faults" is exactly that which Walter acknowledges, and also rejects, in his attached article (written about a decade ago, if I remember correctly). Of course, when the French impressionists first produced their work, those who knew the rules decried their work: https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Exhibition_of_the_Impressionists
This is a beautiful tree and rightly highly regarded. 100 years from now we can judge whether this is a masterpiece or not, it's easier to be objective when distanced from the controversy of the new.
Best wishes to you Meister Pall ;-)
Matt

Anonymous said...

Comparing this maple to the work of the French impressionists? Wow!
Then again, I'm all for it: let's reconvene in 100 years and judge whether this maple is worth something.

Why did you put faults in quotes? I'm not talking about abstract philosophical concepts. Those branches are what they are. Of course people always fall for the "aura" (here the quotes are legitimate) that Meister Pall is trying to cast over suboptimal material to make it appear OK. More often than not it's the difference between eastern and western taste (as in: the Japanese are too conservative to know that something... different ;-) can also be good).

That being said, let me repeat myself: I don't think that this tree is mediocre. I think it's very good. But I don't think that "aura" can add anything to an inherent value of a bonsai. I would argue the opposite: if too much effort is put into increasing the "aura", the inherent value can only decrease. At best.

Mark

Anonymous said...

That is also an interesting tactic - to say that there are better and more important things happening, but with the caveat that they do not exist on the internet, are happening in unnamed countries, so cannot really be discussed. It's also makes these mysterious trees (and their owners) free from any possible criticism.

I don't think the aura is created by talking about a tree, but simply by looking and having the image stick with you.

I think "faults" should stay in quotation marks too. If i walk through the park, every tree i see is "faulty". No one taught them how to grow properly!

Bryan Correa said...

Hi Walter thanks for posting the updates; this tree is what got me interested in bonsai and keeps me inspired