Wednesday, April 24, 2013

Japanese beech

Japanese beech, Fagus crenata, pot by John Pitt



5 comments:

Anonymous said...

Excellent tree! Perhaps a bit heavy on the top, which makes it more suitable for showing when in leaf.

Walter Pall said...

This is a good candidate for the hedge cutting method. I will let the lower branches grow freely all summer during the next years while the top will be pruned back quickly. This will result in much denser growth at the lower limbs and they will at least double in girth. The tree will look kind of strange all summer though.

Walter Pall said...

It is typical for such trees to be top-dominant. If someone keeps such a specimen tree tidy for show or selling for many years the result is an imbalance in the crown. The lower branches will weaken and the upper ones will get too strong. This is exactly the message of the hedgecutting method: DO NOT keep your trees tidy all year round. They will deteriorate over time. It will take about ten years to correct this tree.

Anonymous said...

I didn't mean to argue top dominance. I just noticed that the trunk is quite bulky almost all the way to the top. I think it'd be better if it tapered a bit more in the upper region to counterbalance the great nebari. Hedge cutting method cannot improve that, unless you increase the overall height. And I don't think you should do that. In fact, I think the only option to improve that situation is to decapitate the tree to two thirds it's present height and grow a new top.

Walter Pall said...

Of course, the hedge cutting method is the way to go. Read the article to understand it.